Tennis Tips: Neutral, Offensive, Defensive



IF YOU’RE NOT HITTING, YOU’RE MOVING

By Ian Mindell

Tennis is a movement-based sport, yet many of us don’t move enough. What’s that you say? You move all over the place? Ok, let me clarify. We don’t move to the correct spot on the court enough. We don’t move enough after we hit or our partner hits so we end up doing all of the moving after our opponent hits. The question I often get is where a player is supposed to move after they hit. Often, they just stay where they are or go back to the same spot and wait to see what their opponents do.This is problematic in a number of ways.

First, you are creating a movement imbalance by having to do twice as much work after your opponents hit because very little happened after you or your partner hit. This leaves you little time to get your feet set and attempt to hit an effective shot. It tends to feel more like a game of fetch than a planned strategic shot placement. Second, the ability to consistently step into your shot to create easy power and to cut down on the angles is compromised. The lack of recovery movement often leaves you uncertain if you should run forwards, sideways or backwards to get the ball.

So how do we fix this? It is as easy as two simple ideas: V for victory, and the offense, neutral and defensive recovery positions. The V for victory is the movement pattern that you should try to create when you play tennis. Moving on the tennis court from the moment the opponent hits the ball in a V to where the ball is going to be will help get your bodyweight through the shot, cut down on the time your opponent has to recover and react and give you better angles into your opponent’s side of the court.

VIDEO DEMONSTRATION

How do we make the V for Victory movement work? Simple. After you or your partner has hit a shot, make a quick judgment as to what the shot did or did not do to the opponent. For example, if you felt the shot was hit offensively from your side of the court, try to move forward a couple of steps in anticipation of a weak reply. If you felt the shot was hit defensively, look to move back a couple of steps in order to help defend a possible offensive reply from the opponent. This turns your normally reactive tennis game into a proactive one. If you still get caught out of position, try to adjust to a different position on the court the next time a similar situation arises. This way you are always looking to find the ideal spot to recover to each time the ball leaves your side of the court. You are not always going to be in the right spot, so try to move more after you hit, and this will hopefully help solve the puzzle of your opponent’s game and lead you to victory.

See you moving on the courts!

May 31, 2016

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Early Spring Trail Use



Mountain bikes and heavy tread boots are designed for varied terrain conditions but they can leave trails in a poor state, especially during the late spring when the trails experience a freeze/thaw cycle. Spring runoff from snow can also have lasting effects, often leaving trails waterlogged and susceptible to damage from trail users. There are seasonal times when trails are best left alone by horses, mountain bikers, vehicles, and even hikers.

crazy horse

It can be difficult to accept responsibility for keeping our trail conditions favorable, given our shoulder season feels long and we’re ready to get out there. With so many users and user groups, we need to work together to preserve our trails for many years to come. Over the years, the message of responsible trail usage has shifted. Mountain bikers, hikers and equestrian riders were once told to ride around obstacles, like puddles and logs, but trails widened, new tracks were created, and social trails braided the landscape.

whoopitup

This doesn’t mean that you have to hang up your bike or barn the horses. It only means that you’ll have to research alternatives to soggy single and double-track trails.

For the next couple of weeks, it would be best to stay on south-facing or eastern trails.  Most trails from Alder Creek Adventure Center to the west are muddy and still have large patches of snow.

The Eastern Perimeter trail is running fantastic with spring foliage beginning to bloom. Dirt roads can handle more abuse than our narrow single-track trails and tend to dry out a bit faster. Much of the S.Euer Valley road is dry and provides an excellent opportunity to see Prosser Creek at its highest flows in four years.

higheastperimeter

May 13, 2016

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Go For A Spin



Tahoe Donner Bikeworks offers bike rentals and guided rides on its extensive trail system, with a home base at the Alder Creek Adventure Center offering easy access into the pristine Euer Valley.

Open every day from  9 a.m. – 6 p.m.

Summer Highlights

Kids Camp Returns on May 28 – Sign Up Today

We’re continuing our very popular kids mountain bike camps this summer! They are open to kids ages 10 to 14 who can ride a bike for 1.5 hours at a time. Please contact us for options for older or younger kids. We will focus on providing a fun, safe environment where kids can improve their general mountain biking skills while exploring the trails of Tahoe Donner. Our guides have years of experience teaching kids to become better riders.

Two-day camps run from 9 a.m. to noon on Saturdays and Sundays. They will be offered every weekend from May 28/29 through September 3/4. Cost for the camp is $90 per child.

Week-long camps run from 9 a.m. to noon Monday through Friday. They are available starting on June 20, July 4, July 18, August 1 and August 15. Cost for the camp is $220 per child.

Rentals are available for a separate cost if needed. contact us for reservations.

Sign up for Kids Camps on ShopTD.

Bike Like a Girl

This summer, the Tahoe Mountain Bike Like A Girl team will be leading free afternoon rides just for women. Plan to meet in the parking lot at the Alder Creek Adventure Center at 5:15 p.m. and be ready to ride by 5:30 p.m. This is a great ride in the Euer Valley area for women of all ages and abilities. Don’t miss this opportunity to ride with a great group of ladies riding for a good cause. These rides are scheduled for June 13, August 9, August 23 and September 6. The June ride will have a special treat of being led by Katerina Nash and other local pro riders. (Donations to the Breast Cancer Fund, Bike Like A Girl, and Truckee Trails will be graciously accepted at all the rides.)

The national Bike Like A Girl team will be joining Tahoe Mountain Bike Like A Girl in leading two camps for girls of all ability levels. These clinics will run from 9 a.m. till noon and run for three days. June 29, 30 and July 1will be for girls aged 8-10 years old. July 20, 21 and 22 will be for girls aged 10-12 years old.

Guided Rides

Guided rides are available for $20 per person. These rides last between 1.5 and 2 hours, and are available Friday – Sunday at 10 a.m. or 1 p.m. Route choice is based on the fitness and skill level of the group. We will explore the trails at Tahoe Donner while providing tips and instruction along the way. Rentals are available for a separate cost if needed. Book online at ShopTD or contact us for reservations or more information.

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May 13, 2016

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Alder Creek Cafe Open Daily



Grab some delicious lunch today! Known for healthy and organic homemade food, the Alder Creek Cafe at Alder Creek Adventure Center is now open daily for lunch all summer long. From a strawberry and pistachio salad to shrimp tacos, we have lots of lunch options for you to try. Pictured above is our veggie panini. Preview the menu and stop by this week.

LUNCH HOURS: daily, 11:30 a.m. – 3 p.m.

Additionally, if you love happy hour, return to the Alder Creek Adventure Center every Friday and Saturday and visit Trailside, a bar that offers a special tasting plates menu, plus happy hour: $4 draft selections, $4 house Cabernet and Chardonnay, and a $6 chef’s choice food special.

BAR HOURS: Friday and Saturday, 4 – 8 p.m.

May 9, 2016


Planning for Capital Improvements at Tahoe Donner



How are Capital Improvements paid for?

Tahoe Donner was created over 40 years ago. Over time, infrastructure has aged and member preferences have changed, reflecting the demographics of a younger and more family-oriented membership. To counter the deterioration of aging infrastructure and reflect the values expressed in our Strategic Plan, Tahoe Donner created the Development Fund for capital improvements. Instead of funding capital improvements through special assessments, Tahoe Donner sets aside $250 of each member’s annual assessment in the Development Fund, which avoids financial surprises for members and provides sustainable financial support for capital improvements.

How is the Development Fund spent?

Ideas for improvement come from many sources.

  • Members who use Tahoe Donner amenities provide feedback about deficiencies they see, such as the deterioration of the older locker rooms at Trout Creek.
  • Staff documents “pinch-points,” such as the lack of sufficient parking during peak use periods.
  • Members experience attractions at other locations and express their desire to see them at Tahoe Donner.
  • Repair costs grow so large that a total replacement is more prudent. An example of this would be the Alder Creek Adventure Center replacing the Cross Country/Equestrian Center.
  • Regulatory or technology changes provide an opportunity for cost savings such as the addition of solar power.
  • All of these ideas are evaluated and balanced against the funds available in the Development Fund. Those ideas that provide the greatest benefit for members are prioritized in a list and presented to the board by staff and the member-volunteer General Plan Committee (GPC). Over the last 10 years, more than $16.4 million of major improvements have been made to Tahoe Donner assets by this process.

Why create a new Capital Projects Spending Process?

Over the last three months, the GPC and staff, assisted by members with specific expertise in capital planning, documented a new Capital Projects Spending Process (CPSP). The starting point of this documentation was the work plans that Tahoe Donner has used successfully for years. The end point is a structured, informed and transparent process for taking capital projects from idea to completion. This ensures comprehensive evaluation during project development, accountability for the investment of time and finances, and ongoing transparency for members and other stakeholders.

What is the new CPSP?

The CPSP is a “stage-gate” business process where the necessary tasks are grouped into stages that must be completed in order to trigger the next gate of funds needed to proceed. The GPC, staff and board of directors uses this method to provide clarity and accountability for all stakeholders.

The CPSP has six stages, which are shown in the infographic below this article or you may download it here:

  1. Idea generation
  2. Project selection
  3. Conceptual design
  4. Final design
  5. Construction
  6. Post-project review

To reduce confusion, the CPSP also contains clear definitions of terms. When a member sees the word “estimate” or “quote” they will realize that the finalized and defined costs and schedules have not yet been determined. Those of us who have done home improvements know that the scope and costs of our projects change as we learn about challenges and opportunities. Only when we have the final design and scope in hand with hard quotations from vendors can we have a dependable budget of time and money.

What does the new CPSP do for me?

Tahoe Donner is currently redesigning its website. Included in the new website will be a way to easily track the progress of capital improvement projects. At the same time, other communications such as email, the Tahoe Donner News magazine, town hall meetings, and more will be used to inform members and other stakeholders.

In the meantime, the current website contains the Strategic Plan, the detailed Capital Projects Spending Process flowchart (at right), and soon the Land Management Plan will be added. All new projects will be evaluated to be consistent with these overarching visions.

The GPC is beginning the work on master plans for each amenity which will involve input and feedback from members. These will also provide guidance for project selection. For example, the Downhill Ski Area’s focus as “The Best Place to Begin” helped direct the installation of snowmaking to its Learning Center. Once the new master plans are completed, they will be available on the website.

Your participation in the capital projects spending and planning processes is essential in keeping Tahoe Donner the vibrant mountain community that we all love. If you’d like to volunteer to be involved on a GPC Task Force, please contact either Dwight Walker or Michael Sullivan at GPC@tahoedonner.com.

Download a PDF here.

More information on Capital Projects can be found here.

May 7, 2016


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Grab your calendar and join the fun!

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July 23 Board of Directors Meeting

Watch the July 23 board of directors meeting video.

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Slow it down and relax

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